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11. Inline Validation

The inline validation is about delegating model validation to a dedicated service. The current validation implementation built in the Symfony2 framework is very powerful as it allows to declare validation on a : class, field and getter. However these declarations can take a while to code for complex rules. As rules must be a set of a Constraint and Validator instances.

The inline validation tries to provide a nice solution by introducing an ErrorElement object. The object can be used to check assertions against the model :

<?php
$errorElement
    ->with('settings.url')
        ->assertNotNull(array())
        ->assertNotBlank()
    ->end()
    ->with('settings.title')
        ->assertNotNull(array())
        ->assertNotBlank()
        ->assertLength(array('min' => 50))
        ->addViolation('ho yeah!')
    ->end();

if (/* complex rules */) {
    $errorElement->with('value')->addViolation('Fail to check the complex rules')->end()
}

/* conditional validation */
if ($this->getSubject()->getState() == Post::STATUS_ONLINE) {
    $errorElement
        ->with('enabled')
            ->assertNotNull()
            ->assertTrue()
        ->end();
}

Note

This solution relies on the validator component so validation defined through the validator component will be used.

Tip

You can also use $errorElement->addConstraint(new \Symfony\Component\Validator\Constraints\NotBlank()) instead of calling assertNotBlank().

11.1. Using this validator

Add the InlineConstraint class constraint to your bundle’s validation configuration, for example:

  • using XML:
<!-- src/Application/Sonata/PageBundle/Resources/config/validation.xml -->
<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<constraint-mapping xmlns="http://symfony.com/schema/dic/constraint-mapping"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://symfony.com/schema/dic/constraint-mapping http://symfony.com/schema/dic/constraint-mapping/constraint-mapping-1.0.xsd">

    <class name="Application\Sonata\PageBundle\Entity\Block">
        <constraint name="Sonata\AdminBundle\Validator\Constraints\InlineConstraint">
            <option name="service">sonata.page.cms.page</option>
            <option name="method">validateBlock</option>
        </constraint>
    </class>
</constraint-mapping>
  • using YAML:
# src/Application/Sonata/PageBundle/Resources/config/validation.yml
Application\Sonata\PageBundle\Entity\Block:
    constraints:
        - Sonata\AdminBundle\Validator\Constraints\InlineConstraint:
            service: sonata.page.cms.page
            method: validateBlock

There are two important options:

  • service: the service where the validation method is defined
  • method: the service’s method to call

The method must accept two arguments:

  • ErrorElement: the instance where assertion can be checked
  • value: the object instance

11.2. Example from the SonataPageBundle

<?php
namespace Sonata\PageBundle\Block;

use Sonata\PageBundle\Model\PageInterface;
use Sonata\AdminBundle\Validator\ErrorElement;

class RssBlockService extends BaseBlockService
{
    // ... code removed for simplification

    public function validateBlock(ErrorElement $errorElement, BlockInterface $block)
    {
        $errorElement
            ->with('settings.url')
                ->assertNotNull(array())
                ->assertNotBlank()
            ->end()
            ->with('settings.title')
                ->assertNotNull(array())
                ->assertNotBlank()
                ->assertLength(array('min' => 50))
                ->addViolation('ho yeah!')
            ->end();
    }
}

11.3. Using the Admin class

This feature is deprecated and will be removed on the 2.2 branch.

The above examples show how to delegate validation to a service. For completeness, it’s worth remembering that the Admin class itself contains an empty validate method. This is automatically called, so you can override it in your own admin class:

// add this to your existing use statements
use Sonata\AdminBundle\Validator\ErrorElement;

class MyAdmin extends Admin
{
    // add this method
    public function validate(ErrorElement $errorElement, $object)
    {
        $errorElement
            ->with('name')
                ->assertLength(array('max' => 32))
            ->end()
        ;
    }

11.4. Troubleshooting

Make sure your validator method is being called. If in doubt, try throwing an exception:

public function validate(ErrorElement $errorElement, $object)
{
    throw new \Exception(__METHOD__);
}

There should not be any validation_groups defined for the form. If you have code like the example below in your Admin class, remove the ‘validation_groups’ entry, the whole $formOptions property or set validation_groups to an empty array:

protected $formOptions = array(
    'validation_groups' => array()
);

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